Building

ANALYSIS

The Building Eglinton theme examines the development potential along the corridor under three major headings: mid-rise development, Focus Areas, and station areas.

MID-RISE DEVELOPMENT

Mid-rise buildings are generally appropriate in the Avenue segments of Eglinton (west of Yonge Street and east of Victoria Park), and on properties designated for Mixed-Use. Mid-rise built form has been tested for these sites as part of the Study, demonstrating that they have the potential capacity to accommodate significant growth over the long term. In these areas, changes to the existing zoning will be proposed to permit mid-rise development as-of-right.

For a video version of the above presentation, click here.

The potential for mid-rise development along the corridor has been analyzed based on ideal lot size and configuration. Mid-rise buildings are a form of infill for the redevelopment of sites along Eglinton and increase housing choice, employment and retail opportunities, and community services and amenities.

Examples of existing mid-rise buildings along Eglinton. Click to enlarge

Examples of existing mid-rise buildings along Eglinton. Click to enlarge

In some areas where mid-rise buildings would otherwise be appropriate, redevelopment is constrained by lot configuration or lot depth. For example, some properties are too shallow to allow mid-rise buildings to reach the optimal potential height (equal to the width of the right-of-way). In such cases, Neighbourhood Transition Zones are recommended as a mechanism to maximizing the mid-rise development potential while incorporating an appropriate transition to neighbourhoods.

Click to see how a Neighbourhood Transition Zone can help create more parking, a better street, more optimal intensification and a transition to lower scale neighbourhoods.

Click to see how a Neighbourhood Transition Zone can help create more parking, a better street, more optimal intensification, and a transition to lower scale neighbourhoods.

In other areas, such as properties designated Neighbourhoods, Apartment Neighbourhoods and Employment in the Official Plan, as well as deep lots and Focus Areas, more in-depth study has been undertaken to determine where shorter or taller buildings may be appropriate, where additional design considerations, such as setbacks and stepbacks may be necessary, and where current zoning should not change.

FOCUS AREAS

Six Focus Areas have been identified because of their capacity to accommodate future residential, mixed-use, or employment growth: Westside, Dufferin, Bayview, Laird, Don Mills and Golden Mile (Victoria Park to Birchmount). As each Focus Area is unique, the Study will result in specific concepts and recommendations for each area.

Map of the Focus Areas. Click to enlarge

Map of the Focus Areas. Click to enlarge

Concept planning for each Focus Area provides an opportunity to:

• Develop planning priorities and policy directions, including directions for appropriate built form, height and density
• Develop recommendations for new street and block patterns, open spaces, improved or new connections, transition zones, and strategies to increase employment
• Provide recommendations for a phased implementation, as any change in these areas will happen gradually and over time

STATION AREAS

As part of the built form analysis, the 15 underground Crosstown station areas have also been analyzed, with the objective of integrating new development with station entrances. The stations are important points of connection to the Eglinton corridor and require analysis from a built form and public realm perspective. This work has been undertaken in consultation with Metrolinx.

The analysis provides a brief overview of each of the station areas, identifying:

• Station classification and urban design categories
• Preliminary analysis of opportunities for new open space and context sensitive intensification

In addition, Site Plan review of station building concepts provided by Metrolinx is underway to ensure that the Crosstown stations reflect the City of Toronto’s planning and design objectives and the emerging EGLINTONconnects built form and public realm vision.

Continue reading by reviewing the analysis of Greening.

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